Ten of the weirdest car recalls

Sometimes, carmakers ask for their cars back to repair faults. The reasons will astonish you

Budding Mafiosi with a taste for opposite lock received a blow this week, following news that Ferrari is to recall 3,000 of its 458 Italia and 458 Spider models. For an unusual reason: the front boot’s interior release handle only opens one of the latches.

Still scratching your head? It means that should you find yourself suddenly trapped in the boot of a Ferrari 458 for reasons that you’d much rather not share, you won’t be able to escape by opening it from the inside.

This is apparently a problem for the USA’s safety mandates, though we suspect it’s more of a problem for the person trapped in the boot. We’ve seen Goodfellas. We know what happens to people in boots.

So, according to CNN Money, only the 458 and 458 Spider are covered by the recall, and Ferrari will notify owners to get some modifications done.

Think this is the weirdest recall yet? Prepare to be AMAZED. Or terrified, because the following pages contain traces of spider…

Car: Mazda 6


Earlier this year, Mazda announced a recall on 42,000 Mazda 6 models built between 2010 and 2012 and featuring the 2.5-litre four-pot.

Terrifyingly, it’s because the Yellow Sac spider was attracted to the hydrocarbons in the vent lines, and felt so at home they began to build webs, which caused ‘negative pressure’ in the fuel tank. This pressure could have resulted in cracked tanks, or worse, fire.

Mazda originally installed a cover on the fuel line to prevent the Spider from entering, before reflashing the ECU to change the way it purged the charcoal canister.

Yep, you read that right. SPIDERS.

Car: Subaru Legacy, Subaru Outback, Subaru Impreza, Subaru XV

Reason: Random engine start

Yup, Subarus became self-aware last year. The Japanese company announced a recall for the above named vehicles equipped with the ‘Audiovox’ remote engine start and automatic gearbox. Yeah, start worrying.

Apparently, if the remote engine start fob was dropped, it could ‘randomly transmit an engine start request without pressing the button’. Yowser. Once self-started, the cars could run up to 15 minutes, or until the fuel runs out/key fob battery dies/John Connor is found and terminated.

Car: Toyota Camry/Venza/Avalon

Reason: Frickin’ SPIDERS again

885,000. That’s the really Big Number of cars Toyota recalled late last year because of spider webs.

Apparently, the little critters were spinning their DEATHTRAPS near the air conditioning condensers, causing blockages in draining tubes. This apparently caused water to drip down into the airbag control module, short-circuiting it and in more serious cases, could have caused the airbag to inflate suddenly.

There was even the potential for a complete loss of power steering, too. Top Gear is now incredibly terrified of Spiders. No amount of ‘misunderstood spider’ memes will help.

Car: Honda Odyssey

Reason: Wrong badges

Simple one, this. In 2013, Honda recalled the Odyssey van because it placed the ‘Odyssey’ badge on the wrong side of the rear. It should have been installed on the driver’s side of the boot, but many were incorrectly fitted on the left. Honda reckoned on it affecting the resale value, because of course, ill-fitted badges imply a dodgy motor.

Something BMW 318i owners with M-Division badging ON EVERY BLOODY BODY PANEL know nothing about.


Car: Koenigsegg Agera

Reason: Tyre pressure monitoring

Just when you start to the think that the whole world isn’t ganging up on you, comes news that your beloved hypercar needs to be recalled. But yours and yours alone.

That was the case for a single Koenigsegg owner who earlier this year had to send his lonely little Agera back to the factory because of a faulty tyre pressure monitoring system.

The TPMS didn’t illuminate on the Agera’s restart, and so had to have new software installed.

The saddest thing about the whole episode? The ‘potential number of units affected’ entry in the recall: Just 1.



Car: Chevrolet Cruze

Reason: Steering shaft installation

In 2011, GM recalled over 154,000 Cruze models (remember that?) following news that a customer lost steering control in a car park. Woah. Thankfully it didn’t result in accident or injury.

Apparently there were ‘issues’ with the installation of the steering shaft. No accidents or injuries were reported before the recall.


Car: Toyota Corolla

Reason: Spilled drinks causing airbag problems

In 1995, Toyota issued a recall on 627,858 models of the Corolla because of a faulty airbag sensor. Standard fare, you’d think, but the reason was a little stranger.

The centre console area had a drinks holder. If said drink were to spill over this area, the air bag warning light could illuminate. Worse still, there was a risk the airbag could have been inadvertently deployed.


Car: Chrysler Voyager

Reason: MUSIC

Chrysler recalled the 2004 Voyager because of a problem with the air conditioning ducts.

Condensation could drop through the vent holes and into the top of the radio, which in turn would cause a short circuit, sending a direct current to the rear speakers.

The overall hazard? The rear speakers would get a little melty, and a bit on fire. Though this could have also been explained by the emergence of Lindsay Lohan’s debut album, Speak.

Car: Volkswagen Jetta

Reason: Flaming backsides

Another quick, simple one, this: the seat heater on certain 2002-2004 VW Jettas could malfunction. Because you are all aware what a seat is and what the concept of an excessively heated seat entails, we shall not explain further.


Car: Holden Commodore Ute

Reason: Boot pops open

In 2010, 34,379 models of Holden’s lovable Ute were recalled because of a faulty latch on the boot.

Said faulty latch meant the boot could swing open whenever it felt the need to break free, relieving owners of their goods onto the road behind.


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