2015 Toyota 86 Yellow Limited

2015 toyota 86 yellow limited – DOC636934

Toyota is offering another limited edition of its Hachi Roku successor, the GT 86, and it comes in three forms that progressively add tweaks to the car’s interior upholstery, exterior styling, and handling performance. It’s called the Yellow Limited, and it’s only available to Japanese customers.

The three iterations include the base Yellow Limited, which comes with new details on the inside and outside, the Yellow Limited aero package, which throws on a wing big enough to need navigation lights, and the Yellow Limited aero package FT, which adds new components to the suspension.

Toyota says the special edition was created to “highlight the sporty feeling” of the GT 86 (aka, Scion FR-S/ Subaru BRZ here in the states), and on paper, I’d say highlight is an understatement. This thing is practically dipped in neon, depending on the desired specification.

But does it work? Is it worth extra outlay? Or is it just another limited run without any real substance?

Exterior

First thing first – this car is very yellow. It’s like a school bus filled with bananas while Big Bird sits on top making an all-yoke omelet. Toyota calls the color Sunrise Yellow, but regardless, it’ll get you noticed, that much is for sure. Offsetting the bright please-don’t-pull-me-over hue are several black details, including smoked headlights and taillights, black covers for the side mirrors, and exclusive 17-inch alloy wheels. You also get neat little “86” fender emblems with horizontally opposed pistons and yellow accents.

It’s like a school bus filled with bananas while Big Bird sits on top making an all-yoke omelet.

Other than those details, the rest of the car looks more or less stock. You still get the same aggressive front fascia, short rear end, and raked profile lines.

However, that’s just the baseline Yellow Limited package. If you really want to get arrested, opt for the Yellow Limited aero package, which includes all of the above, plus a dramatic new body kit. 

This includes a much meaner-looking front bumper, with a black trim surround for the central air intake, a more prominent front lip, and canard-style ridges behind the fog lamps. New side skirts bring the car closer to the ground visually, while out back, there’s a bigger diffuser housing the twin polished exhaust tips.

Attached to the trunk is a wing so ginormous it almost sits at the same height as the roofline. The Yellow Limited aero package also comes with a flat underbody, which hopefully offsets the incredible drag produced by that rear wing.

It’s all very boy racer-esque, but honestly, if you’re gonna get a car this yellow, you might as well spring for the full effect. It certainly won’t appeal to everyone’s taste, but personally, I like it. Some folks draw comparisons to the old Supra or Celica, and I can see the influence, which isn’t a bad thing by any means. 

Interior

With an exterior that looks like this, you’d think the interior would be equally wild, but surprisingly, the Yellow Limited keeps things relatively tame.

Upgrades are limited to materials and colors, with Keynote Black used on the leather and Alcantara seats, offset by Ashirai yellow contrast stitching.

Upgrades are limited to materials and colors, with Keynote Black used on the leather and Alcantara seats, offset by Ashirai yellow contrast stitching. This is continued elsewhere in cabin, on the steering wheel, door panels, shift boot and E-brake boot. The rest of the trim is also black.

It’s a nice touch; not overly done, but effective nonetheless. The stock car’s interior feels plastic and cheap, but this feels a bit more upscale. I won’t go as far as saying it’s premium, but it’s definitely nicer.

The rest of the interior remains intact, with a large tachometer mounted centrally in the gauge pod, a polished sport pedal set, and some space in the back for a couple of legless children.

Drivetrain

Finally acquiescing to the demands of performance lovers worldwide, Toyota saw fit to bless the Yellow Limited GT 86 with a turbocharger to substantially boost output from the Subaru -derived 2.0-liter four-cylinder powerplant.

Instead of introducing more power, Toyota left that naturally aspirated engine completely untouched.

Just kidding.

Did I fool you? If I did, you should have known better. Psych!

No, instead of giving it more power, Toyota left that naturally aspirated engine completely untouched. That means you get the same 200 horsepower and 151 pound-feet of torque as in every other factory-stock GT 86/FR-S/BRZ. Routing that power is either a six-speed manual or six-speed ECT automatic gearbox.

Customers can still get a bit more performance with the top-of-the-line Yellow Limited aero package FT, which offers a few upgrades centered on elevating the car’s already impressive handling prowess.

First, the stock rubber is tossed in favor of stickier Bridgestone Potenza S001 tires measuring 215/40R18 up front and 225/40R18 in the back. These are mounted to 18-inch BBS aluminum wheels. The brakes are have upgraded pads, and the suspension gets Sachs shock absorbers.

All in all, it’s a pretty mild set of upgrades to the car’s performance. However, the tires in particular should make a notable difference when exploring the car’s limits, while the pads and shocks are nice-to-haves.

Prices

Pricing for the GT 86 Yellow Limited starts at 3,167,200 yen ($25,665), which includes the yellow exterior paint and new interior trim. Next is the 3,397,200-yen Yellow Limited aero package, which adds the holy-crap body kit. Finally, sitting at the top is the 3,852,200-yen ($31,225) Yellow Limited aero package FT, which adds the bigger wheels, stickier tires and handling upgrades.

And that’s not too bad, considering all the goodies you get with each level.

Toyota will be taking orders up to September 30th, with delivery dates scheduled for November.

Competition

2016 Mazda MX-5

Mazda MX-5

When it comes to the ultimate in small, RWD performance, the MX-5 stands head and shoulders above the rest. Now comfortably in its fourth generation, Mazda somehow managed to cut weight from the already nippy roadster, creating an unfiltered connection between driver and car that’s simply telepathic. Basically, there’s a reason this thing is the best-selling two-seat convertible sports car of all time.

Conclusion

I can see what Toyota is doing. It’s taking its popular sports coupe and wringing every last dollar it can from it by throwing on a slew of crowd-pleasing goodies.

Yes, the $30,000 Limited Yellow aero package FT does add new tires, shocks and brake pads, but is it enough?

I can appreciate that. I think there are more than a few folks out there clamoring to get their hands on this thing. It exudes performance from every angle.

However, that huge wing might be writing checks the rest of the car can’t cash. Yes, the $30,000 Limited Yellow aero package FT does add new tires, shocks and brake pads, but is it enough?

Personally, if I was in the market for a car like this, I’d opt for the similarly priced 2016 Subaru BRZ TS STI, which isn’t quite as flamboyant, but does offer far more in the handling department, including plus-sized brakes and vastly upgraded suspension components. It’s the kind of stuff that matters to the person looking for an apex, not a shiny surface to see their own reflection in.

But who cares? This thing will sell in droves. Plus, it’s like, REALLY yellow!

LOVE IT

  • Probably glows in the dark
  • New body kit looks great
  • Nice handling tweaks

LEAVE IT

  • Not for everyone
  • Not coming to the U.S.
  • Ahem… power?

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